Search THE READING ROOM

Sunday, May 13, 2012

Nine fine reasons to read

In her 2008 bestselling memoir I Feel Bad about My Neck: And Other Thoughts on Being a Woman, Nora Ephron (pictured left) offered a tantalising observation about one of the great joys of her life:

¶ Reading is one of the main things I do. ¶ Reading is everything. ¶ Reading makes me feel I've accomplished something, learned something, become a better person. ¶ Reading makes me smarter. ¶ Reading gives me something to talk about later on. ¶ Reading is the unbelievably healthy way my attention deficit disorder medicates itself. ¶ Reading is escape, and the opposite of escape; it's a way to make contact with reality after a day of making things up, and it's a way of making contact with someone else's imagination after a day that's all too real. ¶ Reading is grist. ¶ Reading is bliss.
    MEG RYAN, BILLY CRYSTAL IN WHEN HARRY MET SALLY. EPHRON WROTE THE SCREENPLAY.
Nora Ephron is best known for a screenwriting career that has included Silkwood (1983), When Harry Met Sally (1989), Sleepless in Seattle (1993), and You've Got Mail (1998). Ephron, who turns 71 this week, worked as a journalist for nearly a decade before publishing a 1975 book of essays (Crazy Salad) and then writing a 1983 novel (Heartburn) that was inspired by her marriage to journalist Carl Bernstein (of Watergate fame).
UPDATE (June 27, 2012): Nora Ephron, R.I.P. — (From today's New York Times) Nora Ephron, an essayist and humorist in the Dorothy Parker mold (only smarter and funnier, some said) who became one of her era’s most successful screenwriters and filmmakers, making romantic comedy hits like “Sleepless in Seattle” and “When Harry Met Sally,” died last night in Manhattan. She was 71. (Obit: Writer and Filmmaker With a Genius for Humor.)

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.